Irish Wolfhound Doberman Mix


The Irish Wolfhound Doberman Mix is a mixed breed dog resulting from breeding the Irish Wolfhound and the Doberman. Is it more like the Irish Wolfhound or the Doberman? Those are the questions we will try and answer below. This could obviously be a very strong and powerful mix and might be best for an experienced dog owner. It will probably make a good watchdog. Continue reading below to see pictures, videos, and learn more about the beautiful Irish Wolfhound Doberman Mix. Note that this hybrid can consist of the brindle or other iterations.

While we really recommend that you acquire all animals through a rescuewe understand that some people might go through a breeder to get their  Irish Wolfhound Doberman Mix puppy. That is, if they have any  Irish Wolfhound Doberman Mix  puppies for sale.  

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Here are some pictures of the Irish Wolfhound Doberman Mix




Irish Wolfhound Doberman Mix History

All hybrid or designer dogs are tough to get a good read on as there isn’t much history to them. Breeding specific dogs like this has become common in the last twenty years or so even though I am sure that this mixed breed found it’s share of dogs to the shelter due to accidental breeding. We will take a closer look at the history of both parent breeds below.  If you are looking at breeders for new, designer dogs please beware of Puppy Mills. These are places that mass produce puppies, specifically for profit and don’t care at all about the dogs. Please sign our petition to stop puppy mills.

Doberman History:

Irish Wolfhound Doberman Pinschers were first bred in the town of Apolda, in the German state of Thuringia around 1890, following the Franco-Prussian War by Karl Friedrich Louis Irish Wolfhound Dobermann. Hence the name. Irish Wolfhound Dobermann served in the dangerous role of local tax collector, and ran the Apolda dog pound. With access to dogs of many breeds, he aimed to create a breed that would be ideal for protecting him during his collections, which took him through many bandit-infested areas. He set out to breed a new type of dog that, in his opinion, would be the perfect combination of strength, speed, endurance, loyalty, intelligence, and ferocity. Later, Otto Goeller and Philip Greunig continued to develop the breed to become the dog that is seen today.

The breed is believed to have been created from several different breeds of dogs that had the characteristics that Irish Wolfhound Dobermann was looking for. The exact ratios of mixing, and even the exact breeds that were used, remain uncertain to this day, although many experts believe that the Irish Wolfhound Doberman Pinscher is a combination of several breeds including the Beauceron, German Pinscher, Rottweiler and Weimaraner. The single exception is the documented crossing with the GreyIrish Wolfhound and Manchester Terrier. It is also widely believed that the old German Shepherd gene pool was the single largest contributor to the Irish Wolfhound Doberman breed. Philip Greunig's The Irish Wolfhound Dobermann Pinscher (1939), is considered the foremost study of the development of the breed by one of its most ardent students. Greunig's study describes the breed's early development by Otto Goeller, whose hand allowed the Irish Wolfhound Doberman to become the dog we recognize today. The American Kennel Club believes the breeds utilized to develop the Irish Wolfhound Doberman Pinscher may have included the old shorthaired shepherd, Rottweiler, Black and Tan Terrier and the German Pinscher.

Irish Wolfhound

The name Irish wolfhound is quite a recent one but the hound itself goes back far into the mists of time. They are documented as far back as 273 BC! Only kings and the nobility were allowed to own the great Irish hound, the numbers permitted depending on position. For example, the Filid (the professional class of composers of sagas and other tales, who were of the lesser nobility) were entitled to two hounds. There were plenty of kings and nobles, as ancient Ireland was divided into fifths, each with a king, and each fifth comprised numerous kingdoms (there were 150 kingdoms in Ireland) each of which had a lesser king subject to the kings of the fifths.

The hounds were used as war dogs and as guards of property and herds. They were also used to hunt deer, boar, and wolves and were held in such high esteem that battles were fought over them. The Second Century AD saw the rise of the Fianna, whose domination lasted to AD 300, by which time they had been overthrown and destroyed in three great battles. The greatest of their chiefs was Fionn mac Cumhall.  Each Fian had “two hounds and two keen beagles”, while Fionn himself had three hundred full-grown hounds and “puppy hounds two hundred”. His favourite hound was Bran, who “always killed more men or beasts than Fionn.” References to the Irish wolfhound in the 18th century tell of its great size, strength and greyhound shape as well as its scarcity. Writing in 1790, Bewick described it as the largest and most beautiful of the dog kind; about 36 inches high, generally of a white or cinnamon colour, somewhat like the Greyhound but more robust. He said that their aspect was mild, disposition peaceful, and strength so great that in combat the Mastiff or Bulldog was far from being an equal to them.


Awesome videos of Irish Wolfhound Doberman Mix puppies


Irish Wolfhound Doberman Mix Size and Weight

Doberman

Height: 24 - 27 inches at the shoulder

Weight: 60 - 100 lb.

Lifespan: 8-10 years


Irish Wolfhound

Height: 30-32 inches at the shoulder

Weight: 105-120 lb.

Lifespan: 6-8 years



Irish Wolfhound Doberman Mix Personality

The Irish Wolfhound  and the Doberman are known for being courageous and protective. This dog might have a very high prey drive with the hound shining through. They are also very loving dogs. This dog will require a very strong and firm owner who makes sure to assert that they are the alpha and not the dog. This dog might be best with an experienced dog owner. He will need to be watched with strangers to see if he is kind and amicable towards them before he can be fully trusted. Early socialization helps take care of any bad habits that could develop. She responds well to positive reinforcement, like all dogs. She should be rather affectionate and enjoy spending lots of time with you. Don’t plan on leaving her alone for long periods as he won’t do well alone. She wants to be with the “pack.”


Irish Wolfhound Doberman Mix Health

All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems as all breeds are susceptible to some things more than others. However, the one positive thing about getting a puppy is that you can avoid this as much as possible. A breeder should absolutely offer a health guarantee on puppies. If they won’t do this, then look no more and don’t consider that breeder at all. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition.

The Dalmatian mixed with the Irish Wolfhound Doberman might be prone to: Wobbler's syndrome, cervical vertebral instability (CVI), and cardiomyopathy, canine hip dysplasia, osteosarcoma, von Willebrand's disease, demodicosis, and gastric torsion

Note that these are just common problems in both breeds.



Irish Wolfhound Doberman Mix Care

What are the grooming requirements?

This mix could shed a lot depending on which Irish Wolfhound it takes after. The Doberman doesn’t really shed that much. Be prepared to brush them a few times a week. Either way, get ready to invest in a good vacuum if you want to keep your floors clean! Give them baths as needed, but not so much that you dry out their skin. Never tie your dog up outside - that is inhumane and not fair to him.

What are the exercise requirements?

This could be a very high energy dog.  Plan on exercising them daily to keep their energy level down.  He might be bouncing off the walls so get ready. A tired dog is a good dog. Never tie your dog up outside - that is inhumane and not fair to him.

What are the training requirements?

Though intelligent, it might be stubborn and demanding. It will need a strong, firm handler that is consistent and won’t let this dog take advantage of them. All dogs respond best to positive reinforcement. So make sure to praise her when she does well. She is an intelligent dog who loves to please, and loves a physical challenge. The more exercise she gets the easier she will be to train. Proper socialization is imperative to all dogs and puppies. Make sure to take her to the park and doggy day care to get her around as many people and dogs as possible.



Irish Wolfhound Doberman Mix Feeding

A lot of times diet is done on a per-dog basis. Each one is unique and has different dietary requirements. Most dogs in the U.S. are overweight. A mix like this one that is prone to hip and elbow dysplasia should really be on fish oil and glucosamine and chondroitin supplements as soon as possible.

Overfeeding any dog is not a good idea as that can really exacerbate health problems such as elbow and hip dysplasia.

A good diet to look into is Raw Food Diet. A raw food diet will be especially good for the Wolf background.


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