Norfolk Terrier

The Norfolk Terrier is a breed that came from Great Britain. Before 1960, the Norfolk Terrier was considered part of the Norwich Terrier breed. Once the ears were distinguished as being different, a new breed was created, named the Norfolk Terrier. The Norwich Terrier has pointed ears, while the Norfolk Terrier has drooped ears. Both of these Terriers—the Norwich and Norfolk—are the two smallest in the working Terriers group.

norfolk terrier image

Norfolk Terriers are considering to be “big dogs in small packages.” They are alert, loving, and loyal. They make for great companions and love to be with and around their families and owners.

Enjoy the lively, popping attitude of a Norfolk Terrier and be happy knowing the Norfolk Terrier will be devoted to you for as long as you are family.



History

The original purpose of a Norfolk Terrier was to hunt for vermin in a barn or around the farm. It was in the 1880s when the Norfolk Terrier started to be bred by British sportsmen. Norfolk Terriers seemed to have come from crossing a local terrier-type dog, the Irish Terrier, and small red Terriers.

First the Norfolk Terrier was called the Cantab Terrier, and then later was called the Trumpington Terrier. During World War I, when the Irish horse riser Frank Jones sold some Norfolk Terriers to the United States, they were named Jones Terriers.

The American Kennel Club officially recognized the Norwich Terrier in 1936. Once the division was made between the Norwich Terrier and the Norfolk Terrier, the Norfolk Terrier was accepted into the American Kennel Club in 1979.


Size

The Norfolk Terrier is considered a small-sized dog. Whether a male or a female, the average height of a Norfolk Terrier is 9 to 10 inches, while the weight average for a Norfolk Terrier is 11 to 12 pounds.


Personality

Norfolk Terriers have an independent streak as well as been described as being fearless. Of the different Terriers, the Norfolk Terriers are considered to have the softest temperaments. Norfolk Terriers also get along with other dogs and love children and people. They make great pets as small and sweet companions dogs.

The breed does not dig often, but if left alone and bored, the Norfolk Terrier may just make you a few holes while finding something to do. Also, the Norfolk Terrier is not a barky or yappy dog, but they will bark due to their watch-dog tendencies.

They do; however, have a strong prey drive as they were used as hunters for decades. Norfolk Terriers are active, alert, good-natured, and they are always ready to play with their family. The Norfolk Terrier breed is so energetic, that they may make their owners tired before they tire themselves out.


Health

The life expectancy of a Norfolk Terrier is between 8 and 14 years; although the breed has been known to live as long as 17 years. Generally known as a healthy breed, the Norfolk Terrier does have a few problems that may arise health-wise.

Mitral valve disease, Canine hip dysplasia, Patellar luxation, and Vaccination sensitivity.

No matter if your Norfolk Terrier is healthy, make sure to take them to regular veterinarian appointments. This will ensure a long and healthy life for your pet.


Care

The Norfolk Terrier has a double coat: a wiry topcoat and a soft undercoat. It would be best to be brushed with a steel comb once a week. This will keep the hair from matting as well as remove any loose and dead hairs. Although this breed is considered to me hypoallergenic, they do shed a minimal amount throughout the year. Feel free to shampoo and wash your Norfolk Terrier every once an a while to keep them clean.

Norfolk Terriers need at least 30 minutes of playtime or exercise every day. A good walk or some playtime would perfect for a Norfolk Terrier.

Because the Norfolk Terrier is intelligent, they are easier to train than some breeds. They are independent as well as stubborn, so that means they can make training a bit of a challenge. Simply stay consistent and positive and training should go well.

On a different note, Norfolk Terriers can gain weight easily, so make sure to feed a Norfolk Terrier on a consistent and regular schedule with proportional feedings.


Rescue

The Norfolk Terrier has a double coat: a wiry topcoat and a soft undercoat. It would be best to be brushed with a steel comb once a week. This will keep the hair from matting as well as remove any loose and dead hairs. Although this breed is considered to me hypoallergenic, they do shed a minimal amount throughout the year. Feel free to shampoo and wash your Norfolk Terrier every once an a while to keep them clean.

Norfolk Terriers need at least 30 minutes of playtime or exercise every day. A good walk or some playtime would perfect for a Norfolk Terrier.

Because the Norfolk Terrier is intelligent, they are easier to train than some breeds. They are independent as well as stubborn, so that means they can make training a bit of a challenge. Simply stay consistent and positive and training should go well.

On a different note, Norfolk Terriers can gain weight easily, so make sure to feed a Norfolk Terrier on a consistent and regular schedule with proportional feedings.


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