Australian Terrier Bloodhound Mix


The Australian Terrier Bloodhound Mix, is a mixed breed dog resulting from breeding the Australian Terrier and the Bloodhound. Both of these dogs can be friendly but personalities differ, so you never know. The Australian Terrier is known for being feven-tempered, spirited, and alert. All dogs need proper socialization and that will be a big factor in how they interact with others. What does this mixed breed look and act like? Is it more like the Australian Terrier or the Bloodhound? Those are the questions we will try and answer below. Continue reading below to see pictures, videos, and learn more about the beautiful Australian Terrier Bloodhound Mix.

While we really recommend that you acquire all animals through a rescue, we understand that some people might go through a breeder to get their Australian Terrier Bloodhound Mix puppy. That is, if they have any Australian Terrier Bloodhound Mix puppies for sale.

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Australian Terrier Bloodhound Mix History

All hybrid or designer dogs are tough to get a good read on as there isn’t much history to them. Breeding specific dogs like this has become common in the last twenty years or so even though I am sure that this mixed breed found it’s share of dogs to the shelter due to accidental breeding. We will take a closer look at the history of both parent breeds below. If you are looking at breeders for new, designer dogs please beware of Puppy Mills. These are places that mass produce puppies, specifically for profit and don’t care at all about the dogs. If you have a few minutes, please sign our petition to stop puppy mills.

Australian Terrier History

As one might surmise, The Australian Terrier comes from Australia. It more than likely comes from a dog known as the Rough-Coated Terrier. Of course, it was bred with other British Terriers more than likely the Dandie Dinmont Terrier, the Skye, the Yorkshire, and the Black and Tan Terrier. After all this breeding the end result was the Aussie.
Like most other dogs that came to Australia, they were bred to face the harsh conditions. The settlers needed a hardy, fearless dog that could work in all kinds of weather. Like most Terriers, Aussies - Australian Terriers - were bred to hunt and exterminate rats and snakes on the outback. Also like most breeds of working dogs, they were used as watchdogs, shepherds, and companions.
Life in the remote regions of Australia was hard and tough for both people and dogs. This helped create a tight bond between Aussies and their people. They are among the smallest of the working terriers, who are very loyal and great companions for their owners.
The American Kennel Club, ACK, first recognized this breed in 1960.



Bloodhound History

The Bloodhound is the oldest of all the scent hounds and the one with the sharpest sense of smell. That means she’s also a favorite with law enforcement, as she can tirelessly track suspects or support search and rescue operations with a high degree of success — even though she will not hold or attack the object of her pursuit, preferring to wait for her handler. Their success as hunters in catching human quarry is so great that they are are one of handful of breeds whose findings can be used and upheld as testimony in a court of law. Bloodhounds are one of the many “gentle giant” breeds who transition easily from a day of work to an evening with the family. They have enjoyed a steady presence in popular culture; for example, the family dog Ladybird in the animated series King of the Hill is a bloodhound, as are the “Bumpuses’ hounds,” a pack that lives next door to Ralphie Parker’s family and ultimately runs off with their Thanksgiving turkey in A Christmas Story. A Bloodhound is also one of the show champion hopefuls in the classic Christopher Guest mockumentary Best in Show. Bloodhound history is thought to reach as far back as the third century A.D., when they are thought to have been selectively bred for centuries with other dogs in the Mediterranean region. Today’s Bloodhound is believed to descend from two known dogs of this period: the St. Hubert’s Hound and the Southern Hound. The British began breeding today’s Bloodhound in the 11th and 12th centuries; eventually, the breed was so highly regarded in Great Britain that the royals and high-ranking church officials kept packs of them.

Over time, England’s deer population waned and hunters turned to foxes as their new quarry. Fox-hunting required a dog with a speedier gait than the Bloodhound, and the Foxhound soon supplanted the Bloodhound as hunting companion of choice. The British Bloodhound, as she became known, nearly disappeared in England the post-World War II years, but by that time she had gradually become a favorite in “the Colonies” among soldiers in battle and police tracking criminals. Bloodhounds were accepted into the American Kennel Club’s Hound Group in 1885.

A bloodhound is at her happiest when tracking. The problem-solving aspect of tracking satisfies her high intelligence and need to solve problems. A Bloodhound was part of the team that collared prison escapee James Earl Ray, murderer of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. However, if you’re not a hunter or employed in law enforcement, you and your Bloodhound can still enjoy hiking, bicycling and walking together.


Australian Terrier Bloodhound Mix Size and Weight

Australian Terrier
Height: 9 - 11 inches at the shoulder
Weight: 12 - 16 lb.
Lifespan: 12-15 years

Bloodhound
Height: 23 - 27 inches at the shoulder
Weight: 80 - 100 lb.
Lifespan: 10 - 12 years


Australian Terrier Bloodhound Mix Personality

The Australian Terrier and the Bloodhound are known for being courageous and protective. The Australian Terrier is known for being lcompanionable and courageous. They are also very loving dogs. This dog will require a very strong and firm owner who makes sure to assert that they are the alpha and not the dog. They are cautious, yet non-threatening with strangers, and are affectionate towards family and children. Early socialization helps take care of any bad habits that could develop. She responds well to positive reinforcement, like all dogs. She should be rather affectionate and enjoy spending lots of time with you. Don’t plan on leaving her alone for long periods as he won’t do well alone. She wants to be with the “pack.”


Australian Terrier Bloodhound Mix Health

All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems as all breeds are susceptible to some things more than others. However, the one positive thing about getting a puppy is that you can avoid this as much as possible. A breeder should absolutely offer a health guarantee on puppies. If they won’t do this, then look no more and don’t consider that breeder at all. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur. We obviously recommend that you look for a reputable animal rescue in your area to find your new mixed breed. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition.

The Australian Terrier mixed with the Bloodhound might be prone to allergies, arthritis, cataracts, diabetes, cancer, among others.

Note that these are just common problems in both breeds.


Australian Terrier Bloodhound Mix Care


What are the grooming requirements?

Even if you know the breed, sometimes it is hard to tell if it will be a heavy shedder or a light shedder. Either way, Get ready to invest in a good vacuum if you want to keep your floors clean! Give them baths as needed, but not so much that you dry out their skin.

What are the exercise requirements?

Plan on taking them for extremely long walks and hikes to keep their energy level down. This mix will more than likely have a high energy level. This exercise will keep them from being destructive. A tired dog is a good dog. A tired dog is a good dog though. Never tie your dog up outside - that is inhumane and not fair to him.

What are the training requirements?

This is an intelligent dog that will be a little bit challenging to train. They are going to want to take the alpha position and need someone with a firm, strong, hand that can let them know their place. The best thing you can do is break the sessions into shorter daily sessions to keep their attention span higher. It might have a prey drive and be disposed to running for and chasing small prey, but if handled properly this can be managed. All dogs respond best to positive reinforcement. So make sure to praise her when she does well. She is an intelligent dog who loves to please, and loves a physical challenge. The more exercise she gets the easier she will be to train. Proper socialization is imperative to all dogs and puppies. Make sure to take her to the park and doggy day care to get her around as many people and dogs as possible.


Australian Terrier Bloodhound Mix Feeding

"A lot of times diet is done on a per-dog basis. Each one is unique and has different dietary requirements. Most dogs in the U.S. are overweight. A mix like this one that is prone to hip and elbow dysplasia should really be on fish oil and glucosamine and chondroitin supplements as soon as possible. A good diet to look into is Raw Food Diet. A raw food diet will be especially good for the Wolf background.

Overfeeding any dog is not a good idea as that can really exacerbate health problems such as elbow and hip dysplasia.

I good diet to look into is Raw Food Diet. A raw food diet will be especially good for the Wolf background."



Australian Terrier Links

Australian Terrier Rescue

Australian Terrier Rescue

Seattle Purebred Rescue


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Boxer Husky Mix

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